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Monthly Archives: October 2018

Haircuts and Cortisone Shots

 

Cricket and Ellie went for their first joint haircut last week, and they came home looking a bit bedraggled. First of all, they both refused to wear the shiny pink and silver hair bows that the groomer was putting on all of the other dogs. Second, Miss Ellie had mats on her ears and tail and was shaved down to the nubs in both places. And, really, Miss Cricket just looked grumpy because we could see her eyes again. But also, Cricket’s back was hurting again. It’s a chronic thing that comes up once every year or two now.

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Haircuts improve their ability to use mind control. Chicken treats, chicken treats.

I wanted to wait an extra day before going to the vet, to see if the pain would resolve with rest and massage. We do some light stretches and massage, and then she just leans on me and gives me her poor me look until I give in and continue the massage, or give her extra treats. It was scary watching Miss Cricket struggle going up the stairs, and even refuse to be picked up onto the bed or the couch, but at least I knew what I was looking at, as opposed to the first time she had back problems, when I thought she had developed a fatal neurological disorder.

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“What is Mommy talking about?”

 

Once her eyes were visible again, and she looked as vulnerable as dogly possible, we took Cricket to see the vet. She’d actually gotten herself up onto the couch at breakfast, because Grandma made sausages, and Cricket knew Grandma would want to share. But the stairs were still a problem and we couldn’t hold out sausages for her all day every day. She was, predictably, terrified when we got to the vet’s office. Actually, she was already hyperventilating in the car, squishing herself between my neck and the headrest. When she actually walked into the waiting room, though, she fell in love at first smell with a little dog resting in his mother’s arms. It turned out that he had diabetes, so it’s possible that what Cricket really noticed was that this stranger smelled suspiciously like Miss Butterfly, and therefore he must be worth knowing.

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Miss Butterfly!

Of course, by the time we saw the vet, he said, eh, no big deal, here’s a shot of cortisone and some pills for the week. And as soon as Cricket left his office she was bouncing like a rubber ball.

Ellie gave Cricket a full sniffing when she came home, and seemed to approve of the vet’s work. Then she went off to play with Cricket’s toys (because all toys belong to Cricket, of course). Cricket has actually seemed to be okay with Ellie playing with the toys, despite Ellie chewing through Ducky’s nose and chopping the top off of the pink plastic vase. But, finally, once she was fully medicated, Cricket hit her limit, because Ellie started to play with Platypus, Cricket’s bestest friend since puppyhood. Cricket didn’t go directly to Ellie with her complaints, though. She went over to Grandma and started barking. Do you need food? Still barking. Water? Still barking. Do you need to go outside? Barking, barking, barking, and glaring over at Ellie who is chewing on Platypus at that exact moment. Aha! Another toy was chosen for Ellie, and Cricket celebrated by mouthing Platypus for a second or two, and then leaving him in the middle of the floor while she returned to her bed for a well-earned nap.

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Ellie and the poor nose-less Ducky

 

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Cricket and her oldest friend

 

She did get back up, though, when it was time for more peanut butter, I mean medicine. She’s still a little ouchy, and not up to jumping on beds, but she’s not giving me the I’m-dying-and-you’re-just-sitting-there look anymore. So, that’s progress.

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Progress!

Going Back to Shul

Now that I have more free time, because I don’t have a social work internship this semester, I’m free to return to my regular activities, including the irreverent Bible seminar at my synagogue every other Thursday night. I could even go to the open choir practices, which are supposed to be less stressful than the ones I tried five or six years ago, where I tried to learn twenty new pieces of music, in four part harmony, in a month. Or I could join a committee, of some kind. But, I’ve been feeling reluctant to step back into the flow, aware, all over again, that I don’t quite fit in.

On the first day of Rosh Hashanah, every year, we have the one event of the year where my dogs are invited into the synagogue community. The service is called Tashlich and it’s all about casting our sins into the water, by way of bread (traditionally), or bird seed, or cheerios. It’s a kid and dog friendly service, because it is held outdoors and it is short. There’s also singing, which makes it Rachel-friendly. I am not a believer in this casting-off-of-sins business, so I never join in with that part of the service. But I go, because it’s dog day. How could I skip dog day?

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“But, isn’t every day dog day?”

It was pouring rain for Tashlich this year, but I wasn’t going to skip Cricket and Ellie’s only opportunity all year to be seen and heard. We arrived before anyone else, and Ellie tried to make friends with the geese, despite the rain, dragging me through puddles, and piles of green goose poop, while the geese studiously avoided her. Someone I often see at services arrived after us, and said he was surprised that I had dogs, which seemed off to me. I thought everyone in the world knew that I had dogs; that you could see it through my skin. My dogs are my family, but I’m not sure that’s something the people in my community are able to understand, because my dogs aren’t human children. There is no synagogue school, or dog-friendly classes, or services for them on a regular basis. I can’t bring my girls to the bible seminar, or to choir practice, which means I can’t bring a big part of who I am with me.

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“I never knew going to services could be so much fun!”

The dogs were completely soaked by the time the rest of the small crowd arrived, but they got the chance to meet a grey-haired toy poodle who looked suspiciously like a baby lamb, and a tiny Maltese, and even a few bigger dogs. I met a woman with a husband, two little boys, and a dog, and she told me that she had to come despite the rain. I thought I’d found a kindred spirit, but she said, no, it’s not because it’s the one time of the year that dogs are allowed, but because she had so many sins she needed to get rid of. I wasn’t sure if she was joking or not.

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“Mommy, did you know that rain is very, very wet?”

The next day, the junior rabbi came up to me at services, congratulating me on going to services, “rain or shine.” I explained, for what felt like the hundredth time, that I went because it was my only chance to bring my dogs to shul, but she didn’t seem to understand what I was saying. Maybe, in her eyes, I was just an obsessively religious person, I don’t know.

And then I missed Yom Kippur with vertigo, and continued to wonder if it was really worth all of the effort to keep going to shul if I was left feeling, endlessly, unknown. I went to Friday night services, two days after Yom Kippur, because the world had stopped spinning, and because I just like Friday night services. When the senior rabbi came up to me, to see how I was doing post Vertigo, he asked if there was anything he could do, and I got brave for a second and asked if Ellie could come to services on Monday morning, for Sukkot, since the services were being held in the Sukkah, and the Sukkah is, technically, outdoors. And the rabbi said yes.

I’m not sure I would have been motivated to get up early for services on that Monday morning, without the promise of Ellie being able to go to shul with me. I knew not to even think of bringing Cricket; she’s terrible with crowds, and her Attention Deficit Disorder would have made the two hour service torture for her. But Ellie was perfect. She sat quietly on my lap and let people pet her. Only one person seemed to have a problem with her being there: when I first walked into the Sukkah, holding Ellie in my arms, and sat down in the back row (of three), one woman from the back row stood up and moved up front. She didn’t say anything to me, just moved, so I don’t know if she was allergic to dogs, or just didn’t like being around them, but it made me feel uneasy. I worried that other people would have the same reaction, but as soon as they began to notice Ellie, they smiled and reached out to pet her. One woman purposely sat down next to me and fell in love with my Ellie within minutes. The junior rabbi laughed at Ellie’s funny faces from across the Sukkah, and made sure that the one little (human) girl at services had noticed the puppy dog. The senior rabbi made a point of publicly welcoming Ellie, as a hypoallergenic family member who was able to join us at services for this special occasion.

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Ellie learning how to be a therapy dog, in therapy.

I’m still trying to absorb how good it felt to be allowed to have Ellie with me at shul. I don’t expect to be able to bring her to synagogue with me on a regular basis, because we are rarely outside for services or other events, but just knowing that she’s been seen, and that I’ve been seen with her, means a great deal to me.

 

My New Nephew

 

I finally got to meet my new canine nephew last week. His name is Coby and he’s an eight month old Husky. He came home five or six months ago, but this was my first chance to meet him in person. When I entered my brother’s house, Coby and his canine sister, Lilah, a black Lab, fought for the right to hug me first. I have the black and blue marks on my arm to prove it. I pity any burglar who tries to enter their house, because he won’t know what hit him with all of those kisses.

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“You let other dogs kiss you?”

We didn’t bring Cricket and Ellie with us for the visit because Cricket has had trouble with visits when there was only Lilah to contend with; two big dogs would have given her a heart attack. I think Ellie would have liked to meet Lilah and Coby, and maybe even enjoyed running through the back yard with them, but Cricket would never have forgiven me for leaving her home and taking Ellie out for the day. And, when Ellie inevitably peed on my sister-in-law’s rugs, family violence would have ensued, so we were better off leaving her at home as well. It was actually Ellie’s longest stay at home with just Cricket for company. The evidence of her anxiety was left on the living room rug, because Miss Ellie is not clear on the difference between rugs and wee wee pads, and will pee and rest on both. So now we have a new, indoor/outdoor, easy to clean, living room rug, and I’m hoping that Ellie will figure out that rugs are not for peeing on.

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Ellie getting cozy on the wee wee pad.

Back at my brother’s house, we spent some time out in the Sukkah, getting to know Coby, and catching up with my other canine and human nephews and nieces. Miss Lilah, the black Lab, has that long suffering big sister look that Cricket wears constantly, but she made sure to bring me both her leash and Coby’s when she wanted to go for a walk. Cricket would never have been able to relate to such a thing.

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This is Coby, in the Sukkah, sitting on his human sister’s lap.

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Sweet Lilah.

My second oldest nephew is the dog whisperer of the house. He willingly wakes up in the middle of the night when Coby, still not quite potty-trained, asks to go out, and Lilah has a huge dog bed that fills most of his floor, but she still prefers to sleep in his bed, leaving my nephew two or three inches to stretch out in. He doesn’t seem to mind sharing his space with the dogs, or allowing the housekeeper to come in and clean, but he’s building a fingerprint lock to keep out the other members of the family. He hasn’t figured out how to add a paw print censor to the lock, but I’m sure that will come next, or else the dogs will just break down the door. He even has a 3D printer of his own, to build new parts for his fingerprint lock and other creations, and he made me a name plate as a gift, to show me how it works. It’s nice to have geniuses in the family, but it’s even better when they are also sweet, and kind and good people (or dogs).

When we finally got home, Cricket and Ellie were wild-eyed, as if they’d spent most of the day convincing each other that we were never going to return. They’d probably also been talking to their canine neighbor across the hall, Oliver, a black haired Shih-Tzu/Bichon mix, about the horrors of being left behind by their humans. He’s their size, and therefore manageable, even for Cricket. If only we could temporarily miniaturize Lilah and Coby, maybe they could spend a day visiting with Cricket and Ellie, just like Oliver does sometimes. I’ll have to discuss this with my second oldest nephew, he’ll be the one to know where to start.

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This is Oliver, carrying one of Cricket and Ellie’s toys on his walk.